How to make Instagram-like filters with Photoshop

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  • SumoMe

Wish you could recreate those cool Instagram filters without Instagram? Now you can recreate some of your favorite filters with these easy steps.

1. Amaro

1. First, increase the brightness and contrast of your picture. Do this by going to Image > Adjustments > Brightness/Contrast.

2. To add a soft yellow light, create a new fill layer over the photo. Go toLayer > New Fill Layer > Solid Color. Play around until you find a good shade, or you could just enter the shade I used in the hex color code field: #f4eabd.

3. Click OK. While you still have the layer selected, click on the dropdown menu right above it and select “Multiply” instead of the default of “Normal.” This will add a soft light over your photo as opposed to an opaque layer.

4. Next, open up the Levels menu. You can do this with Command / Ctrl + L, or you can go to Image > Adjustments > Levels. In the dropdown menu for “Channel,” select “Blue.” Increase the Output Levels at the bottom of the menu from 0 to 117 by dragging the left slider towards the center of the spectrum. This will add a blue tint to the photo.

5. From here, I had to make some more minor adjustments by decreasing the Contrast a bit more to give it a faded look.

6. Next, open up Color Balance with Command / Ctrl + B, or Image > Adjustments > Color Balance. Make sure the radio dial below is set to “Midtones.” Play around until you have a good blend of colors, but I chose to increase my Red, Green and Yellow levels.

7. Boom you’re done.

 

2. Nashville

1. To mimic the soft purple tint of the Nashville filter, open up the Levels menu with Command / Ctrl + L or Image > Adjustments > Levels. Select “Blue” in the dropdown menu for “Channel.” Increase the Output Levels at the bottom of the menu from 0 to 58 by dragging the left slider toward the center of the spectrum.

2. To soften the blue tint a bit, add a new layer of light yellow by going toLayer > New Fill Layer > Solid Color. The hex color #f6ddad adds a peachy tone to contrast the blue.

3. Next, increase by Brightness and decrease the Contrast by going toImage > Adjustments > Brightness/Contrast.

4. Change the Color Balance with Command / Ctrl + B, or Image > Adjustments > Color Balance. Increase the Cyan, Green and Blue levels.

5. If the color is still not quite right, change the hue with Command / Ctrl + U, or Image > Adjustments > Hue/Saturation. I moved the Hue slider just a bit to the right to emphasize the blue a bit more.

6. From here, I went back and adjusted the Color Balance a bit more by moving all sliders just a bit to the right for the final result.

7. Boom you’re done.

 

3. 1977

1. Adjust the Red Output Levels of your photo to replicate 1977’s warm tone. Do this with Command / Ctrl + L or Image > Adjustments > Levels. Select “Red” in the “Channel” dropdown menu, and then increase the Output Level by moving the left slider at the bottom of the menu toward the center of the spectrum.

2. To counter with Blue for a purple tone, select “Blue” in the “Channel” dropdown menu and move the left slider just a little bit toward the center.

3. Increase the Brightness and Contrast of your photo by going to Image > Adjustments > Brightness/Contrast.

4. Fine-tune the colors of your photo with Command / Ctrl + B or by going to Image > Adjustments > Color Balance. Make sure the radio button is set on “Midtones” at the bottom of the menu. Increase the Red, Green and Blue levels.

5. Finally, adjust the overall Levels of your photo with Command / Ctrl + L or by going to Image > Adjustments > Levels. Keep the “Channel” dropdown menu selected at “RGB” and move the middle slider slightly to the right. This will emphasize the shadows of your photo even more.

7. Boom you’re done.

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About Author

Bridget is President of The Get Smart Web Consulting Group, a web presence and digital strategy firm with offices in San Diego County California and Collier County Florida. But more importantly she is a web, tech, and Twitter addict!